Zero Trauma 2056

NSW has set an aspirational target of zero trauma on the transport network by 2056, which will save around 350 lives, and 12,000 serious injuries every year. This current level of trauma causes unnecessary suffering of affected friends and family, and represents a cost to our community of more than $7 billion per year.

By 2056, technology and safety will be built into all networks, delivering zero trauma on all parts of the transport system with the short-term goal to deliver a 30% reduction on road fatalities or serious injuries by 2021.

Human error is responsible for 90% of all road crashes. Automated safety systems, like cruise control, lane assist and automatic braking, are already available on many new vehicles today, with car manufacturers working to deliver fully automated vehicles within the next decade.

Connected and automated vehicles could involve safer, smoother journeys and improved handling of higher traffic volumes.

The NSW Government is working with our industry partners to undertake testing of technologies so we can understand the risks and benefits and better engage with customers on what these vehicles will mean for the network.

A two-year automated bus trial is in progress at Sydney Olympic Park. Once tested, we will work with industry to deploy automated technology where it can immediately improve service levels. First deployment would focus on regional and remote communities where better connections are needed.

Safely operated networks

Safety, security and performance are interlinked. A safe, high-performing system will focus on the provision and management of networks, people and fleet across NSW to the highest design and technological standards.

To deliver a zero-trauma network, Transport for NSW is introducing the ‘Safe Systems’ approach. This involves designing a transport system integrated with human behaviour to ensure users are not harmed. It involves all elements of the system (infrastructure, vehicles, speeds and user behaviour) working together and interacting with the system itself to ensure safety. It also requires the right mix of conditions to be in place to keep different users safe within the system for specific areas – for example, between metro and regional, places for people, movement corridors or interchanges.

Personal security

The design and addition of physical barrier and median treatments in high risk areas and appropriate separation of pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles in centres and on major road corridors will deliver better safety outcomes.

The design and addition of physical barrier and median treatments in high risk areas and appropriate separation of pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles in centres and on major road corridors will also deliver better safety outcomes.

Learn about other outcomes for our State

A new vision for NSW

Customer Focused

A Strong Economy

Successful Places

Sustainable

Accessible Services

Explore the full strategies and plans

Future Transport Strategy 2056

Regional NSW Services and Infrastructure Plan

Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan