Creating vibrant connected centres

The sort of place we all want to live is one where local shops, cafes, schools and basic services are all just a short walk away. Walkable communities will be facilitated by Future Transport 2056 Strategy 2056 through the investigation of a significant program of public transport investment, with higher density development closer to public transport enabling vibrant, accessible, walkable communities.

Across NSW, communities will rely on the three Global Gateway Cities to meet their needs. These are the state capital of Greater Sydney, the Australian capital city of Canberra and the growing city of Greater Newcastle. We’re making it a priority to connect the broader regions around these Global Gateway Cities. This ensures people across the state will have access to the high-quality services and facilities such as medical services, major education institutions and international travel and trade gateways located in these cities.

Areas across NSW in the north, south and far west will also be supported by cities within Queensland, Victoria and South Australia such as Gold Coast and Brisbane, Toowoomba, Adelaide and Melbourne. Efficient, seamless cross-border connections will be necessary to support people travelling between one state or territory to the next.

With the majority of regional NSW’s population living in regional cities and centres in the future, the most effective way of providing better transport is through the development of a public transport network that connects regional cities and centres, rather than a network focused on bringing people in and out of Sydney. Regional cities and centres will play a bigger role as hubs for other services such as retail, health, education and recreational opportunities.

Improving east-west connections is also a priority for the Strategy. A lot of investment over the past 20 years has been focused on creating efficient north-south connections. A future focus on east-west connections between the inland and coastal regions will support the population on the coast whilst also opening tourism and trade connections to the inland regions.

By linking people to their closest regional centre or city, people across the state will have better connections within and between regions. This is important for accessing jobs, services and education opportunities.

An equitable transport system that provides regular, high-quality connections to regional centres and cities will increase the opportunities available for people living in regional NSW. Quality transport services will reach across state borders, providing regional areas efficient access to their closest capital city.

Balancing movement and place

Our centres are places of intense economic and community activity, where most jobs, services and key attractions are located, including shops, restaurants and parks. Balancing the needs of our customers to move easily around centres while ensuring they are attractive places for activities is particularly relevant to how our roads, public and active transport corridors are planned and operated.

Meeting the needs of both movement and place is part of the Future Transport 2056 Strategy and aims to balance the needs of:

  • Public transport customers, who depend on that corridor for efficient movement.
  • Freight operators who need efficient corridors and kerbside access to meet delivery timeframes.
  • Private car users who want to access the corridor and parking areas.
  • Local businesses, whose customers and suppliers want easy access.
  • Residents, visitors, pedestrians and cyclists who want to enjoy the area at their pace.

We will balance these needs by working with local stakeholders to apply the Movement and Place Framework within centres. This means that in some streets at certain times of the day, pedestrian movement will be prioritised while other streets will be important corridors for public transport and cars. As centres become busier and public transport improves, parking space may be used for public transport or loading zones.

Balancing movement and place in Sydney

The delivery of the Eastern Distributor in Greater Sydney’s east shows how changes to the road network can provide new opportunities for walking and cycling on local roads and improve the liveability of our streets.

Opened in 1999, the motorway between the city and Sydney Airport and Port Botany reduced traffic on streets in Sydney’s east, including Crown Street, Surry Hills. This enabled a number of amenity-based improvements to be made to the road to support local land use, including:

  • Conversion of former one-way through streets to two-way, local streets with parking
  • Landscaping and improvements in pedestrian priority
  • Implementation of cycleways for residents and commuters to Sydney CBD

These initiatives have been crucial to the revitalisation of Crown Street and adjacent local streets, where local restaurants and shops have thrived. This part of the Eastern City is now a key attraction for Sydneysiders and visitors alike, contributing to the productivity, liveability and sustainability of our city.

Balancing movement and place in regional NSW

Transport projects that reduce car use, increase walking, or support higher levels of housing supply are opportunities to improve the public domain. Planned town bypasses for instance should be delivered alongside town renewal projects that enhance retail and recreational experiences and walkability and support safe active transport.

Investing in active transport

Walking and cycling are great ways to move around our city. Every weekday in Greater Sydney, customers make around eight million journeys that are shorter than two kilometres and fifteen million trips less than 10 kilometres. Our aim is to make walking or cycling the transport choice for quick trips under two kilometres and grow the share of cycling for trips up to 10 kilometres to support access to centres and public transport as well as healthy transport choices for trips within local areas.

As well as supporting active and healthy lifestyles that prevent illness, walking and cycling increase the vibrancy of local places and are efficient ways to travel short distances, while reducing congestion and lowering emissions and air pollutants.

A coordinated investment to connect parks and open spaces across the city will help support more active transport links. This ‘green grid’ will support walking and cycling around and between centres, extend public transport catchments and reduce car dependence.

To find out more, explore our Future Transport 2056 Strategy, the Regional NSW Services and Infrastructure Plan or the Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan.

As well as supporting active and healthy lifestyles that prevent illness, walking and cycling increase the vibrancy of local places and are efficient ways to travel short distances, while reducing congestion and lowering emissions and air pollutants.

A coordinated investment to connect parks and open spaces across the city will help to support more active transport links. This ‘green grid’ will support walking and cycling around and between centres, extend public transport catchments and reduce car dependence.

Learn about other outcomes for our State

A new vision for NSW

Customer Focused

A Strong Economy

Safety and Performance

Sustainable

Accessible Services

Explore the full strategies and plans

Future Transport Strategy 2056

Regional NSW Services and Infrastructure Plan

Greater Sydney Services and Infrastructure Plan